Blood Pressure & Heart Disease Easy Home Remedies

Blood Pressure & Heart Disease Easy Home Remedies

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8 Foods to Help Lower Blood Pressure

8 Foods to Help Lower Blood Pressure

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Low-fat Milk:

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It truly does a body good! Drinking heart-healthy low-fat milk will provide you with calcium and vitamin D — the two nutrients work as a team to help reduce blood pressure by 3 to 10 percent. Although this doesn’t sound like much, it could add up to about a 15 percent reduction in risk for cardiovascular disease.

Spinach:

A green leafy delight,spinach is low in calories, high in fiber, and packed with heart-healthy nutrients like potassium, folate, and magnesium — key ingredients for lowering and maintaining blood pressure levels. Need an easy way to eat more of this great green? Try mixing fresh spinach leaves into salads or adding them to sandwiches. And definitely try these Spinach Turkey Burgers.

Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds are also a great source of magnesium. A quarter cup of these super seeds make a nutritious snack — but be sure to buy them unsalted, since you’ll also want to minimize your sodium intake.

Beans

Nutritious and versatile, beans (including black, white, navy, lima, pinto, and kidney) are chock-full of soluble fiber, magnesium, and potassium, all excellent ingredients for lowering blood pressure and improving overall heart health. Add beans to your favorite salads, soups, or wraps; as a bonus, they’re pretty inexpensive.

Baked White Potato

Baked white potatoes are rich in both magnesium and potassium, two vital nutrients for heart health. When potassium is low, the body retains extra sodium (and too much sodium raises blood pressure). On the other hand, when you eat a potassium-rich diet, the body becomes more efficient at getting rid of excess sodium. Like potassium, magnesium is also a key player in promoting healthy blood flow. Therefore, maintaining a healthy balance of both minerals can help keep high blood pressure at bay.

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Bananas

This functional fruit is packed with potassium, so it’s a great choice for an on-the-go snack. Add a banana to your breakfast (my Banana-Raspberry Oatmeal makes a great morning meal) or for an evening treat, slice a banana into several half-inch wheels, place them in a small plastic bag, and freeze.

Soybeans

Soybeans are another excellent source of potassium and magnesium. Look for soybeans in the pod (edamame) in the freezer case at your grocery store; for a healthy snack, boil one cup and pop them directly out of the shell into your mouth. If you miss the salt, lightly sprinkle with salt substitute.

Dark Chocolate

Hooray for dark chocolate! Eating about 30 calories a day of dark chocolate — just one tiny square — was shown to help lower blood pressure after 18 weeks without weight gain or other adverse effects, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Choose dark chocolate consisting of at least 70 percent cocoa powder. Because chocolate is also high in calories, you’ll want to be very careful not to overdo it.

Courtesy of joybauer

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More tips to Help to Lower Blood Pressure:

  • Eat more poultry, fish, nuts, and legumes (beans) and less red meat.
  • Choose low-fat or nonfat milk and other dairy products instead of full-fat versions.
  • Turn to vegetables and fruits instead of sugary or salty snacks and desserts.
  • Select breads, pasta, and other carbohydrate-rich foods that are made from whole grains instead of highly refined white flour.
  • Eat fruit instead of drinking fruit juice.
  • Use unsaturated fats like olive, canola, soybean, peanut, corn, or safflower oils instead of butter, coconut oil, or palm-kernel oil.
  • Rely on fresh or frozen foods instead of canned and processed foods.
  • Choose low-sodium foods whenever possible; use herbs, spices, vinegar, and other low-sodium flavorings instead of salt.
  • Don’t skip meals; try to eat one-third of your calories at breakfast.
  • If you need help, record everything that you eat day by day for a week. Have this information reviewed by a dietitian.

7 Foods That Are Good For High Blood Pressure

7 Foods That Are Good For High Blood Pressure

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Hypertension: The Silent Killer

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a serious health problem common among Americans. Over time, it causes blood vessel damage that can lead to heart disease, kidney disease, stroke, and other problems.

Hypertension sometimes is called the silent killer because, by itself, it produces no symptoms. If you don’t get your blood pressure checked regularly, hypertension could go unnoticed, and untreated, for years.

High Blood Pressure and Diet

Your diet plays a big role in whether you have high or normal blood pressure. Dietary recommendations for lowering blood pressure, such as the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet, include reducing your intake of fat, sodium, and alcohol.

The DASH guidelines also suggest eating more foods rich in potassium, calcium, and magnesium. In general, you should eat more low-fat protein sources, whole grains, and plenty of fruits and vegetables. The following slides present some of the best foods you can eat to lower your blood pressure.

Leafy Greens

Foods high in potassium give you a better ratio of potassium to sodium. Improvements in this ratio can help with lowering blood pressure. Leafy greens like romaine lettuce, arugula, kale, turnip greens, collard greens, and spinach are high in potassium.

Try to opt for fresh or frozen greens, as canned vegetables often have added sodium. Frozen vegetables, on the other hand, contain just as many nutrients as they do when fresh and are easy to store.

Berries

Berries, especially blueberries, are rich in natural compounds called flavonoids. One study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that consuming these compounds may prevent hypertension, and possibly help to reduce high blood pressure as well.

Blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries are easy to add to your diet. Put them on your cereal every morning. Keep frozen berries on hand for a quick and healthful dessert.

Potatoes

Potatoes are high in both potassium and magnesium, two minerals that can help to lower your blood pressure. They are also high in fiber, which is necessary for an overall healthy diet. Enjoy a baked potato as the centerpiece of your dinner. Instead of fattening and salty butter and sour cream, try adding plain yogurt or salsa for flavor.

Beets

Researchers at the Queen Mary University of London found that patients with high blood pressure saw significant improvements in blood pressure from drinking beetroot juice. The study authors concluded that it was the nitrates in the juice that brought down the participants’ blood pressure within just 24 hours.

You can juice your own beets or simply cook and eat the whole root. Beetroot is delicious when roasted or when added to stir-fries and stews. Remember to use caution when handling beets—their deep red color will stain your hands and clothes.

Skim Milk

The DASH diet recommends increasing the amount of calcium-rich foods that you eat. Skim milk is an excellent source of calcium and is low in fat, another important element of a diet for lowering blood pressure.

Swap out your higher-fat milk for skim milk, or if you don’t care for milk, eat more low-fat or non-fat yogurt. Just watch out for those that are high in sugar.

Oatmeal

High-fiber, low-fat, and low-sodium foods are just what you want for lowering your blood pressure, and oatmeal fits the bill. Oatmeal for your breakfast is a great way to charge up for the day.

On its own, oatmeal can be bland, but refrain from adding too much sugar. Instead, add fresh or frozen berries to sweeten it up, and maybe just a touch of honey.

Bananas

Bananas are a great way to add potassium to your diet. Adding foods that are rich in this mineral to your diet is better than taking supplements, and it’s easy. Slice a banana into your breakfast cereal or oatmeal, or take one to work every day for a quick, easy, and inexpensive snack.

Courtesy of Health Line

10 Ways to Control High Blood Pressure without Medication

High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

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10 ways to control high blood pressure without medication

By making these 10 lifestyle changes, you can lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk of heart disease.

Blood pressure categories

Systolic Diastolic
Normal (optimal) <120 and <80
Prehypertension 120–139 or 80–89
Hypertension ≥140 or ≥90

If you’ve been diagnosed with high blood pressure (a systolic pressure — the top number — of 140 or above or a diastolic pressure — the bottom number — of 90 or above), you might be worried about taking medication to bring your numbers down.

Lifestyle plays an important role in treating your high blood pressure. If you successfully control your blood pressure with a healthy lifestyle, you may avoid, delay or reduce the need for medication.

Here are 10 lifestyle changes you can make to lower your blood pressure and keep it down.

1. Lose extra pounds and watch your waistline

Blood pressure often increases as weight increases. Losing just 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) can help reduce your blood pressure. In general, the more weight you lose, the lower your blood pressure. Losing weight also makes any blood pressure medications you’re taking more effective. You and your doctor can determine your target weight and the best way to achieve it.

Besides shedding pounds, you should also keep an eye on your waistline. Carrying too much weight around your waist can put you at greater risk of high blood pressure. In general:

  • Men are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 40 inches (102 centimeters, or cm).
  • Women are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 35 inches (89 cm).
  • Asian men are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 36 inches (91 cm).
  • Asian women are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 32 inches (81 cm).

2. Exercise regularly

Regular physical activity — at least 30 to 60 minutes most days of the week — can lower your blood pressure by 4 to 9 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). And it doesn’t take long to see a difference. If you haven’t been active, increasing your exercise level can lower your blood pressure within just a few weeks.

If you have prehypertension — systolic pressure between 120 and 139 or diastolic pressure between 80 and 89 — exercise can help you avoid developing full-blown hypertension. If you already have hypertension, regular physical activity can bring your blood pressure down to safer levels.

Talk to your doctor about developing an exercise program. Your doctor can help determine whether you need any exercise restrictions. Even moderate activity for 10 minutes at a time, such as walking and light strength training, can help.

But avoid being a “weekend warrior.” Trying to squeeze all your exercise in on the weekends to make up for weekday inactivity isn’t a good strategy. Those sudden bursts of activity could actually be risky.

3. Eat a healthy diet

Eating a diet that is rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products and skimps on saturated fat and cholesterol can lower your blood pressure by up to 14 mm Hg. This eating plan is known as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet.

It isn’t easy to change your eating habits, but with these tips, you can adopt a healthy diet:

  • Keep a food diary. Writing down what you eat, even for just a week, can shed surprising light on your true eating habits. Monitor what you eat, how much, when and why.
  • Consider boosting potassium. Potassium can lessen the effects of sodium on blood pressure. The best source of potassium is food, such as fruits and vegetables, rather than supplements. Talk to your doctor about the potassium level that’s best for you.
  • Be a smart shopper. Make a shopping list before heading to the supermarket to avoid picking up junk food. Read food labels when you shop and stick to your healthy-eating plan when you’re dining out, too.
  • Cut yourself some slack. Although the DASH diet is a lifelong eating guide, it doesn’t mean you have to cut out all of the foods you love. It’s OK to treat yourself occasionally to foods you wouldn’t find on a DASH diet menu, such as a candy bar or mashed potatoes with gravy.

4. Reduce sodium in your diet

Even a small reduction in the sodium in your diet can reduce blood pressure by 2 to 8 mm Hg. The recommendations for reducing sodium are:

  • Limit sodium to 2,300 milligrams (mg) a day or less.
  • A lower sodium level — 1,500 mg a day or less — is appropriate for people 51 years of age or older, and individuals of any age who are African-American or who have high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease.
  • To decrease sodium in your diet, consider these tips:
  • Track how much salt is in your diet. Keep a food diary to estimate how much sodium is in what you eat and drink each day.
  • Read food labels. If possible, choose low-sodium alternatives of the foods and beverages you normally buy.
  • Eat fewer processed foods. Potato chips, frozen dinners, bacon and processed lunch meats are high in sodium.
  • Don’t add salt. Just 1 level teaspoon of salt has 2,300 mg of sodium. Use herbs or spices, rather than salt, to add more flavor to your foods.
  • Ease into it. If you don’t feel like you can drastically reduce the sodium in your diet suddenly, cut back gradually. Your palate will adjust over time.

5. Limit the amount of alcohol you drink

Alcohol can be both good and bad for your health. In small amounts, it can potentially lower your blood pressure by 2 to 4 mm Hg. But that protective effect is lost if you drink too much alcohol — generally more than one drink a day for women and men older than age 65, or more than two a day for men age 65 and younger. Also, if you don’t normally drink alcohol, you shouldn’t start drinking as a way to lower your blood pressure. There’s more potential harm than benefit to drinking alcohol.

If you drink more than moderate amounts of it, alcohol can actually raise blood pressure by several points. It can also reduce the effectiveness of high blood pressure medications.

  • Track your drinking patterns. Along with your food diary, keep an alcohol diary to track your true drinking patterns. One drink equals 12 ounces (355 milliliters, or mL) of beer, 5 ounces of wine (148 mL) or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor (45 mL). If you’re drinking more than the suggested amounts, cut back.
  • Consider tapering off. If you’re a heavy drinker, suddenly eliminating all alcohol can actually trigger severe high blood pressure for several days. So when you stop drinking, do it with the supervision of your doctor or taper off slowly, over one to two weeks.
  • Don’t binge. Binge drinking — having four or more drinks in a row — can cause large and sudden increases in blood pressure, in addition to other health problems.

6. Avoid tobacco products and secondhand smoke

On top of all the other dangers of smoking, the nicotine in tobacco products can raise your blood pressure by 10 mm Hg or more for up to an hour after you smoke. Smoking throughout the day means your blood pressure may remain constantly high.

You should also avoid secondhand smoke. Inhaling smoke from others also puts you at risk of health problems, including high blood pressure and heart disease.

7. Cut back on caffeine

The role caffeine plays in blood pressure is still debatable. Drinking caffeinated beverages can temporarily cause a spike in your blood pressure, but it’s unclear whether the effect is temporary or long lasting.

To see if caffeine raises your blood pressure, check your pressure within 30 minutes of drinking a cup of coffee or another caffeinated beverage you regularly drink. If your blood pressure increases by five to 10 points, you may be sensitive to the blood pressure raising effects of caffeine.

8. Reduce your stress

Stress or anxiety can temporarily increase blood pressure. Take some time to think about what causes you to feel stressed, such as work, family, finances or illness. Once you know what’s causing your stress, consider how you can eliminate or reduce stress.

If you can’t eliminate all of your stressors, you can at least cope with them in a healthier way. Take breaks for deep-breathing exercises. Get a massage or take up yoga or meditation. If self-help doesn’t work, seek out a professional for counseling.

9. Monitor your blood pressure at home and make regular doctor’s appointments

If you have high blood pressure, you may need to monitor your blood pressure at home. Learning to self-monitor your blood pressure with an upper arm monitor can help motivate you. Talk to your doctor about home monitoring before getting started.

Regular visits to your doctor are also likely to become a part of your normal routine. These visits will help keep tabs on your blood pressure.

  • Have a primary care doctor. People who don’t have a primary care doctor find it harder to control their blood pressure. If you can, visit the same health care facility or professional for all of your health care needs.
  • Visit your doctor regularly. If your blood pressure isn’t well controlled, or if you have other medical problems, you might need to visit your doctor every month to review your treatment and make adjustments. If your blood pressure is under control, you might need to visit your doctor only every six to 12 months, depending on other conditions you might have.

10. Get support from family and friends

Supportive family and friends can help improve your health. They may encourage you to take care of yourself, drive you to the doctor’s office or embark on an exercise program with you to keep your blood pressure low. Talk to your family and friends about the dangers of high blood pressure.

If you find you need support beyond your family and friends, consider joining a support group. This may put you in touch with people who can give you an emotional or morale boost and who can offer practical tips to cope with your condition.

Courtesy of Mayo Clinic

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Blood Pressure & Heart Patient Avoid Fried Foods in Ramadan

Blood Pressure & Heart Patient Avoid Fried Foods in Ramadan, medical expert

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Lahore General Hospital, Associate Professor of Medicine + announced + later said that people with high blood pressure and heart diseases Ramadan Avoid fried foods.

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According to Dr. Israr ul Haq, later in the month of Ramadan every Muslim to win the blessings of the month, but this month the complaints of high and low blood pressure go up. He suffered from high blood pressure and heart disease patients are fasting Iftar and Sehri times but fried or fatty foods so they stay away from the holy month of Ramadan in good health while winding able.

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Sunshine Helps Lower Blood Pressure

Sunshine Helps Lower Blood Pressure

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A vitamin found in natural sunlight and oily fish could potentially reduce high blood pressure, according to research.

Scientists from the University of South Australia identified a strong link between low levels of vitamin D, absorbed by the body from sunlight, and higher levels of blood pressure.

They believe it is the first study of its kind to suggest that taking vitamin D supplements could be an alternative to drugs for tackling high blood pressure in some patients.

The discovery also makes a strong case for packing your bags and jetting off to sunnier climes more often.

Holidaymakers who suffer from high blood pressure should make sure they purchase pre-existing medical condition travel insurance before embarking on trips overseas. This provides the peace of mind you need to enjoy your holiday, just in case something goes wrong on your travels.

Vitamin D is found in oily fish, as well as being routinely added to milk, yet our diets only account for a small amount of the nutrient that actually makes it into the bloodstream compared with exposure to the sun.

In fact, figures show that as many as three-quarters of Britons have vitamin D intakes which are below recommended levels, with children and older people deemed the most at-risk groups nationwide.

The Food Standards Agency does not recommend a specific daily dose of vitamin D unless you fall into one of the following categories: elderly, pregnant, Asian, get little sun exposure or eat no meat or oily fish. Daily supplements of 10mcg are advised in these cases.

Genetic data from a database of 146,500 people across Europe and North America was used in the new study.

The researchers, who looked at particular genetic variants in the blood, found each 10% increase in vitamin D in the system was linked to lower blood pressure and an 8.1% lower chance of suffering from hypertension.

The findings were published in the The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal.

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Vitamin D cuts blood pressure and sunshine is the BEST way to get your daily dose

Boosting vitamin D may offer an alternative to drugs by cutting the risk of heart attacks and stroke, say scientists.

Eight million Britons take pills to combat high blood pressure, which affects one in three adults.

Researchers found that every 10 per cent rise in vitamin D in the system was linked to lower blood pressure and an 8.1 per cent lower chance of suffering from hypertension.

The vitamin is absorbed by the body from sunlight but is also found in small amounts in eggs, meat and oily fish.

High blood pressure is the main risk factor for stroke and plays a major part in heart failure and kidney disease.

A third of those with high blood pressure do not know it, which is why it is called the “silent killer”. The new study, published in the Lancet, is the first to find strong evidence that increasing vitamin D levels could be an alternative to hypertension drugs such as beta-blockers.

Lead researcher Professor Elina Hypponen from the University of South Australia said: “In view of the costs and side effects associated with anti-hypertensive drugs, the potential to prevent or reduce blood pressure and therefore the risk of hypertension with vitamin D is very attractive.”

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