113 Year-Old-Man Reveals His Secret: 5 Foods For Long Life

113 Year-Old-Man Reveals His Secret: 5 Foods For Long Life

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Bernardo LaPallo is not an ordinary man. Born in 1901 and at 113 he is older than any of you and that happened not by chance but by sheer discipline and desire to live longer. He has a few secrets though; five of them to be exact and he shared that so you can live a long life too.

LaPallo who hails from Mesa, Arizona claims that he has never been sick a day in his life and that he has avoid red meat and eats mostly organic food and vegetables. His secret is a recipe that he inherited from his father who was a doctor and a much disciplined man.

Bernardo LaPallo is already 113 years old and still kicking.

If you think that yeah maybe he’s 113 years old but can’t live decently, you’re wrong. He can still do a lot of stuff including solving crosswords and reading books – not ebooks, he is traditional like that.

We listed the five foods below for your convenience:

Garlic
Garlic has been used in many continents as a medicinal herb. It has antiseptic and antibacterial properties that have been proven to work effectively without the side effects.

Honey
Honey, nature’s best sweetener has been featured in our blog several times for its wonderful effects. If you need a sweetener, our 110-year-old legend wants you to use this.

Cinnamon
Cinnamon is a popular food enhancer and while extracts from the bark of the cinnamon tree have also been used traditionally as medicine throughout the world, the very cinnamon power you can buy in stores can lower blood cholesterol and prevent onset of diabetes.

Chocolate
The food of the gods is called as such for a reason. And if you think chocolates are just for kids or those with sweet tooth, you’re wrong. LaPallo says it’s a vital ingredient in having a long life.

Olive oil
Wars have been fought for olive and its oil. We’re not kidding. But today you can easily buy them in groceries and they’re not expensive at all. Incorporate it in your daily diet and feel the difference.

Habits That Make You Tired – Thakawat Ki Wajohat

Habits That Make You Tired

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Note for Urdu Readers: Urdu Main Khakawat Ki Wajohat Parhnay K Liaye Is Page Kay End per Jain

Tiredness is not a symptom that defines any one particular disease. Rather, tiredness can be a symptom of many different diseases and conditions. Causes of tiredness range from lack of sleep and over exercise to medical and surgical treatments. The lack of energy associated with tiredness can sometimes cause difficulty with normal daily activities, leading to problems with attentiveness and concentration.

Fatigue, in medical terminology, refers to the state of reduced capacity for work or accomplishment following a period of mental or physical activity. For example, muscles fatigue if the are called upon to repetitively work for an extended period. Most of the causes of tiredness are also associated with fatigue.

Lifestyle Factors

If you are experiencing fatigue, your activities and other lifestyle choices may be the root cause. In these cases, the reasons behind your feelings of exhaustion are often fairly easy to pinpoint. Fatigue can be caused by:

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  • physical activity and excessive physical exertion
  • lack of activity
  • lack of sleep
  • being bored
  • being overweight or obese
  • periods of emotional stress
  • grief
  • taking certain medications, such as antidepressants or those that have a sedative effect
  • using alcohol on a regular basis
  • using street drugs, such as cocaine, on a regular basis
  • using narcotics
  • consuming caffeine
  • not eating a proper and nutritious diet
  • Medical Issues

Some medical issues and conditions that can lead to fatigue are:

  • anemia
  • pain
  • Addison’s disease (a disorder affecting your hormone levels)
  • hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid)
  • hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid)
  • arthritis
  • insomnia and other sleeping disorders
  • eating disorders, such as anorexia
  • autoimmune disorders
  • fibromyalgia
  • congestive heart failure
  • cancer
  • diabetes
  • kidney or liver disease
  • infection
  • chronic fatigue syndrome
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (or COPD, which makes it difficult to breathe)
  • emphysema
  • restless legs syndrome

Mental Health Issues

Those who struggle with anxiety and depression may experience fatigue as a symptom of their condition.

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Natural Energy Foods for Tiredness

Natural Energy Foods for Tiredness

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Foods That Fight Fatigue

Dozing off at your desk? Instead of reaching for an elixir that touts to take your energy level off the charts, make sure your meals and snacks include these naturally energizing eats.

As our energy levels decrease because of our overstressed lifestyles, many people look for a quick fix to combat fatigue.

Energy drinks mask the symptoms of fatigue and dehydrate the body. The majority of energy drinks contain excess sugar, high levels of caffeine and other stimulants.

Recently, the 5-hour Energy shot and Monster Energy drink have come under fire.

The Food and Drug Administration said this month that 13 deaths have been reported after consumption of 5-hour Energy. Last month, the parents of a 14-year-old girl filed suit, alleging that she died after drinking two Monster Energy drinks in a 24-hour period. Anais Fournier’s underlying heart condition was complicated by caffeine toxicity, according to the death certificate.

Relying on caffeine and energy drinks makes us feel worse in the long run by causing our system to crash.
Continued fatigue decreases the immune system, making us more susceptible to depression and illness.

So what to do? Exercise, sleep and reducing stress are important in fighting fatigue. But our eating habits also directly affect energy levels. And nutrition can affect energy levels throughout the day.

Here are some tips on healthy ways to boost your energy:

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Drink water
The body needs water — multiple glasses a day.

Being hydrated is an easy and inexpensive way to increase energy levels. You don’t need vitamin water or sports drinks; they only add extra unneeded calories. Keep a fresh water source with you at all times and drink throughout the day. Add lemons, limes or oranges for taste variety.

Eat breakfast
This is the meal that sets the stage for the entire day.

Studies show that breakfast helps keep you alert, starts your metabolism for the day and keeps you satisfied until lunch.

But a healthy breakfast is the key. Good options include whole-grain cereals, breads, fruit and lean protein instead of doughnuts, pastries and white breads. A hard-boiled egg sliced into a whole wheat pita, oatmeal with fruit, and whole-grain toast with natural peanut butter are all healthy choices.

Don’t forget protein
Not consuming enough protein during the day can be a primary reason for fatigue. Protein-based foods provide the body with fuel to repair and build tissues. Protein takes longer than carbohydrates to break down in the body, providing a longer-lasting energy source. You can find protein in poultry, fish, lean red meat, nuts, milk, yogurt, eggs, yogurt, cheese and tofu.

Keep your carbs smart
Carbohydrates are the body’s preferred source of fuel. Pick whole grains like cereal, brown rice and whole wheat bread, and avoid sweets, which cause energy to plummet. Many processed carbohydrates contain little to no fiber. Always read the nutrition label.

Snacks are important
If you let yourself get too hungry between meals, your blood sugar falls, and you get lethargic. Keep your blood sugar and energy level steady during the day by consuming snacks. Choosing the right snacks prevent peaks and valleys in energy.

Combine complex carbs with a protein and/or fat for lasting energy. The protein and fat slow the breakdown of sugar into the blood, preventing fatigue. Snacks also can prevent overeating at mealtimes. A few examples of smart snack choices are yogurt with fruit, mixed nuts, veggies with hummus, pears with almond butter, whey protein shake or blueberries with a cheese stick. Plan ahead!

Omega-3 fatty acids
Studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation, combat depression and improve mood and memory. Try to focus on omega-3 fats from food rather than supplements. Excellent sources include salmon, tuna, walnuts, flax seeds, leafy greens and hemp seeds.

Magnesium
Almonds, walnuts and Brazil nuts are rich in magnesium, a mineral important in converting carbohydrates into energy. Other good sources of magnesium include whole grains and dark green vegetables.

Don’t skimp on calories
Skimping on calories decreases your metabolism and causes you to feel lethargic. Keep your energy levels high and increase metabolism by meeting your caloric needs each day. Whole foods are preferred over supplements to obtain protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals instead of one or two single nutrients. Consume a variety of foods for overall health but also to keep your energy levels high.

Courtesy of CNN & & Urdu Digest

Blood Pressure & Heart Disease Easy Home Remedies

Blood Pressure & Heart Disease Easy Home Remedies

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The 8 Worst Foods To Eat At Night

The 8 Worst Foods To Eat At Night

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Not only is opening your mouth before shutting your eyes a recipe for gaining weight and sleeping poorly, but it can also seriously damage the tissue in your throat and esophagus.

No doubt you’re familiar with acid reflux, which occurs when digestive juices back up into the chest and/or throat and cause a burning sensation. But there’s also something called “silent reflux,” which is different from common heartburn. It has the same causes but without the usual symptoms. Instead of indigestion, sufferers get sore throats, chronic coughs, and have difficulty swallowing.

According to Jamie Koufman, MD, a New York City laryngologist who has been studying and treating the condition for about 30 years, nearly 50% of Americans have silent reflux and don’t know it.

“The single greatest risk factor is, by far, the time that people eat dinner,” says Koufman, who also directs the Voice Institute of New York. She recommends having supper no later than 3 hours before bed. But even if you manage to do that, be aware that late-night snacking can have the same ruinous effect. If you are going to hit the fridge or pantry before you hit the sack, here are 8 things you should never-ever grab:

Alcohol: It relaxes the valves that connect the stomach and esophagus. When this happens, your body is unable to keep food where it belongs. “If you have alcohol just before bed, you’re pretty much asking to have reflux,” says Koufman.

Soda: It doesn’t get much more acidic than soda; in fact, soda is actually more acidic than anything found in nature, notes Koufman. The acid damages those valves. Plus, carbonation increases stomach pressure.

Fatty foods: These include ice cream, cookies, and cheeseburgers. Like the comfort foods they are, they comfort and relax the valves.

Chocolate: It’s high in fat, too, plus it contains caffeine and a lesser-known stimulant called theobromine, essentially making it a triple whammy.

Cheese: It’s also high in fat, but if you must indulge, hard varieties such as Parmesan and Swiss have less of a reflux effect than softer types such as feta and mozzarella. (Yes, that means no pizza.)

Nuts: When it comes to reflux, fat is fat, whether saturated or unsaturated. So despite the fact that nuts generally contain a healthy dose of the latter, they should be avoided before bed. Cashews, walnuts, macadamias and peanuts are the worst, according to Koufman, while pistachios and almonds aren’t quite so bad.

Citrus: It’s also highly acidic. A glass of orange juice or a green apple are your worst choices, but some people can eat red apples without problems.

Coffee: Not only is it inherently acidic, but the caffeine it contains also generates additional stomach acid. If you must sip, decaf generally has lower acid levels than regular.

So what options are left when the midnight munchies strike? Koufman endorses anything that’s low in acid, such as bananas, a bowl of low-sugar cereal with low-fat milk or, her favorite, chamomile tea. “It’s soothing,” she says. “It sort of fills you up and settles the stomach.”

Courtesy of Health Digezt

7 Foods That Should Never Cross Your Lips

7 Foods That Should Never Cross Your Lips

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Which foods should you avoid?

Clean eating means choosing fruits, vegetables, and meats that are raised, grown, and sold with minimal processing. Often they’re organic, and rarely (if ever) should they contain additives. But in some cases, the methods of today’s food producers are neither clean nor sustainable. The result is damage to our health, the environment, or both.

So we decided to take a fresh look at food through the eyes of the people who spend their lives uncovering what’s safe—or not—to eat. We asked them a simple question: “What foods do you avoid?” Their answers don’t necessarily make up a “banned foods” list. But reaching for the suggested alternatives might bring you better health—and peace of mind.

1. Canned tomatoes

Fredrick Vom Saal, PhD, an endocrinologist at the University of Missouri who studies bisphenol-A, gives us the scoop:

The problem: The resin linings of tin cans contain bisphenol-A, a synthetic estrogen that has been linked to ailments ranging from reproductive problems to heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Unfortunately, acidity (a prominent characteristic of tomatoes) causes BPA to leach into your food. Studies show that the BPA in most people’s body exceeds the amount that suppresses sperm production or causes chromosomal damage to the eggs of animals. “You can get 50 mcg of BPA per liter out of a tomato can, and that’s a level that is going to impact people, particularly the young,” says vom Saal. “I won’t go near canned tomatoes.”

The solution: Choose tomatoes in glass bottles (which do not need resin linings), such as the brands Bionaturae and Coluccio. You can also get several types in Tetra Pak boxes, like Trader Joe’s and Pomi.

Budget tip: If your recipe allows, substitute bottled pasta sauce for canned tomatoes. Look for pasta sauces with low sodium and few added ingredients, or you may have to adjust the recipe.

2. Corn-fed beef

Joel Salatin, co-owner of Polyface Farms and author of half a dozen books on sustainable farming, gives us the scoop:

The problem: Cattle evolved to eat grass, not grains. But farmers today feed their animals corn and soybeans, which fatten up the animals faster for slaughter. But more money for cattle farmers (and lower prices at the grocery store) means a lot less nutrition for us. A recent comprehensive study conducted by the USDA and researchers from Clemson University found that compared with corn-fed beef, grass-fed beef is higher in beta-carotene, vitamin E, omega-3s, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), calcium, magnesium, and potassium; lower in inflammatory omega-6s; and lower in saturated fats that have been linked to heart disease. “We need to respect the fact that cows are herbivores, and that does not mean feeding them corn and chicken manure,” says Salatin.

The solution: Buy grass-fed beef, which can be found at specialty grocers, farmers’ markets, and nationally at Whole Foods. It’s usually labeled because it demands a premium, but if you don’t see it, ask your butcher.

Budget tip: Cuts on the bone are cheaper because processors charge extra for deboning. You can also buy direct from a local farmer, which can be as cheap as $5 per pound.

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3. Microwave popcorn

Olga Naidenko, PhD, a senior scientist for the Environmental Working Group, gives us the scoop:

The problem: Chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), in the lining of the bag, are part of a class of compounds that may be linked to infertility in humans, according to a recent study from UCLA. In animal testing, the chemicals cause liver, testicular, and pancreatic cancer. Studies show that microwaving causes the chemicals to vaporize—and migrate into your popcorn. “They stay in your body for years and accumulate there,” says Naidenko, which is why researchers worry that levels in humans could approach the amounts causing cancers in laboratory animals. DuPont and other manufacturers have promised to phase out PFOA by 2015 under a voluntary EPA plan, but millions of bags of popcorn will be sold between now and then.

The solution: Pop natural kernels the old-fashioned way: in a skillet. For flavorings, you can add real butter or dried seasonings, such as dillweed, vegetable flakes, or soup mix.

Budget tip: Popping your own popcorn is dirt cheap.

4. Nonorganic potatoes

Jeffrey Moyer, chair of the National Organic Standards Board, gives us the scoop:

The problem: Root vegetables absorb herbicides, pesticides, and fungicides that wind up in soil. In the case of potatoes—the nation’s most popular vegetable—they’re treated with fungicides during the growing season, then sprayed with herbicides to kill off the fibrous vines before harvesting. After they’re dug up, the potatoes are treated yet again to prevent them from sprouting. ” Try this experiment: Buy a conventional potato in a store, and try to get it to sprout. It won’t,” says Moyer, who is also farm director of the Rodale Institute (also owned by Rodale Inc., the publisher of Prevention). “I’ve talked with potato growers who say point-blank they would never eat the potatoes they sell. They have separate plots where they grow potatoes for themselves without all the chemicals.”

The solution: Buy organic potatoes. Washing isn’t good enough if you’re trying to remove chemicals that have been absorbed into the flesh.

Budget tip: Organic potatoes are only $1 to $2 a pound, slightly more expensive than conventional spuds.

5. Farmed salmon

David Carpenter, MD, director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at the University at Albany and publisher of a major study in the journal Science on contamination in fish, gives us the scoop:

The problem: Nature didn’t intend for salmon to be crammed into pens and fed soy, poultry litter, and hydrolyzed chicken feathers. As a result, farmed salmon is lower in vitamin D and higher in contaminants, including carcinogens, PCBs, brominated flame retardants, and pesticides such as dioxin and DDT. According to Carpenter, the most contaminated fish come from Northern Europe, which can be found on American menus. “You could eat one of these salmon dinners every 5 months without increasing your risk of cancer,” says Carpenter, whose 2004 fish contamination study got broad media attention. “It’s that bad.” Preliminary science has also linked DDT to diabetes and obesity, but some nutritionists believe the benefits of omega-3s outweigh the risks. There is also concern about the high level of antibiotics and pesticides used to treat these fish. When you eat farmed salmon, you get dosed with the same drugs and chemicals.

The solution: Switch to wild-caught Alaska salmon. If the package says fresh Atlantic, it’s farmed. There are no commercial fisheries left for wild Atlantic salmon.

Budget tip: Canned salmon, almost exclusively from wild catch, can be found for as little as $3 a can.

6. Milk produced with artificial hormones

Rick North, project director of the Campaign for Safe Food at the Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility and former CEO of the Oregon division of the American Cancer Society, gives us the scoop:

The problem: Milk producers treat their dairy cattle with recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH or rBST, as it is also known) to boost milk production. But rBGH also increases udder infections and even pus in the milk. It also leads to higher levels of a hormone called insulin-like growth factor in milk. In people, high levels of IGF-1 may contribute to breast, prostate, and colon cancers. “When the government approved rBGH, it was thought that IGF-1 from milk would be broken down in the human digestive tract,” says North. As it turns out, the casein in milk protects most of it, according to several independent studies. “There’s not 100% proof that this is increasing cancer in humans,” admits North. “However, it’s banned in most industrialized countries.”

The solution: Check labels for rBGH-free, rBST-free, produced without artificial hormones, or organic milk. These phrases indicate rBGH-free products.

Budget tip: Try Wal-Mart’s Great Value label, which does not use rBGH.

7. Conventional Apples

Mark Kastel, former executive for agribusiness and codirector of the Cornucopia Institute, a farm-policy research group that supports organic foods, gives us the scoop:

The problem: If fall fruits held a “most doused in pesticides contest,” apples would win. Why? They are individually grafted (descended from a single tree) so that each variety maintains its distinctive flavor. As such, apples don’t develop resistance to pests and are sprayed frequently. The industry maintains that these residues are not harmful. But Kastel counters that it’s just common sense to minimize exposure by avoiding the most doused produce, like apples. “Farm workers have higher rates of many cancers,” he says. And increasing numbers of studies are starting to link a higher body burden of pesticides (from all sources) with Parkinson’s disease.

The solution: Buy organic apples.

Budget tip: If you can’t afford organic, be sure to wash and peel them. But Kastel personally refuses to compromise. “I would rather see the trade-off being that I don’t buy that expensive electronic gadget,” he says. “Just a few of these decisions will accommodate an organic diet for a family.”

Courtesy of prevention.com

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